Author Topic: Why different web sites?  (Read 2986 times)

sorc

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Why different web sites?
« on: January 14, 2010, 05:17:39 am »
   

My WZR-AGL300NH Ver.1.53 directs me to www.buffalotech.com to look for firmware updates. Unfortunately, this site seems to have never heard about that device. I have to got to www.buffalo-technology.com to find downloads for this router.

 

Which leads me to the question: Why are there two very different support sites?

 

 


davo

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Re: Why different web sites?
« Reply #1 on: January 14, 2010, 11:36:08 am »
   

buffalo-technology.com is for Europe

buttalotech.com is for the United States

PM me for TFTP / Boot Images / Recovery files  LSRecovery.exe file.

drmemory

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Re: Why different web sites?
« Reply #2 on: January 15, 2010, 08:52:53 am »

www.buffalotech.com  is the homepage to get to the rest of the buffalo sites. Look in the upper right corner to select from the world map, to get to your local Buffalo Technology site.

Not all subsidiaries have the same products. Those that have the same name of product, may have different controllers in the products - therefore their Firmwares will not work, or may even brick a product from a different world location.

I.E. installing a FW from a different country, may stop your product from working and voids your warranty.


thetimo

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Re: Why different web sites?
« Reply #3 on: March 26, 2010, 05:16:34 am »
   

I could've opened a new thread, actually it's been on my mind for a while now. But your post was good for me to jump into the subject of different products in different areas. Especially what comes to NASes.

 

Why is it so that in different geographical areas you sell (and support) different devices? I can understand it clearly when talking about wireless devices. But why network storages??? :smileysurprised:

 

One can ask why GUIs are different and why do the firmware versions go in different steps. It's obviously got something to do with the chipsets used, but what's the point?