Author Topic: Will restoring to factory settings wipe this drive clean?  (Read 11321 times)

vdotmatrix

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Will restoring to factory settings wipe this drive clean?
« on: June 22, 2012, 07:44:26 pm »

Below is the procudure to reset the ADMIN  and password default log in.

 

If I do this will it erase this network drive?

 

 

Initialization

You can restore settings to their factory defaults by clicking Restore LinkStation. You can choose to either keep the current admin password after initialization, or revert the password to its default setting of “password”.

You can also restore factory settings with the following procedure:

1. Move the power switch to the ‘Off’ position. The LinkStation will shut down after about 45 seconds.

2. While holding down the function button, move the power switch to the ‘On’ position. The function button will begin to flash blue.

3. While the function button is still flashing, press it again. Initialization may take several minutes.


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Initialization will affect different settings on the LinkStation depending on which method you use.

Initializing the LinkStation from within the Web Admin Tool restores the following settings to their factory defaults: LinkStation name, description, NTP settings, Workgroup settings, shared services, shared folder access, user list, group list, email notification, UPS settings, and backup jobs. The Admin password may optionally be reset as well.

Initializing the LinkStation with the function button and power switch restores the following settings to their factory defaults: DHCP, frame size, and Admin password. 


eclectice

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Re: Will restoring to factory settings wipe this drive clean?
« Reply #1 on: June 23, 2012, 11:03:37 am »

In Linux (Buffalo NAS runs on Linux), all devices (like harddisks or usbdisks) are mounted and dismounted under /mnt directory. This directory is usually not affected by firmware update. So, about the data in hardisks/usbdisks; they will remain intact even when the firmware is corrupted. If the firmware is corrupted, you can still access the data in the harddisks/usbdisks (by mounting them to a Linux machine). In case of RAID-ed harddisks, you need to set up a troubleshooting machine in a RAID mode that matches the setup of the harddisks to recover the data. Unless, the firmware update does something dangerous like wiping the data of mounted devices in the /mnt directory (which never happens), then the data will be affected by this event.

 

When you ask a factory reset, the scripts under /etc/init.d  in your Buffalo NAS firmware will instruct a program /usr/local/sbin/nas_configgen to perform what you have described in the second paragraph. These scripts do not touch anything under the /mnt directory, so your data in the mounted harddisks/usbdisks are not affected by the factory reset.